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July 2017 ISSUE

An Age of Ice

1
Feng Su had always been an open-minded person. Regarding age, for instance: she felt it was just a number for medical records. It didn’t signify who you must look up to or down upon, and it wasn’t a reason for intimacy or estrangement. She had never played the age card with her daughter, never put [...]

July 2017 ISSUE

The Oracle

There was a time of rains.
They lashed the old hill and the cobbled market, driving traders under awnings, robotnik beggars into litter-strewn alcoves, revelers into bars and sheesha pipe emporiums. The smell of lamb fat, slowly melting over rotating skewers of meat, flavored the air, mixing with the sweetness of freshly-baked baklava and the tang [...]

July 2017 ISSUE

Editor's Desk: Listening to the Universe

When the universe calls, you have no choice but to listen. Five years ago this month, it sent me a message in the form of a near-fatal heart attack. It was the sort of thing that not only caught me off guard, but my family, friends, and doctors as well. As I lay there in [...]

June 2017 ISSUE

An Account of the Sky Whales

This episode features “An Account of the Sky Whales” written by A Que and translated by Andy Dudak. Publishing in the the June issue of Clarkesworld Magazine and read by Kate Baker.

Text of this story can be found at: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/mille…

Support us on Patreon at http://patreon.com/clarkesworld

 
icon for podpress  Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 129 - An Account of the Sky Whales by A Que [84:33m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download (33220)

June 2017 ISSUE

My Dear, Like the Sky and Stars and Sun

Elspeth keeps her shop in the outer rim—in the circle most distant from the center-city—in a neighborhood no one knows. It squats in the shade of two sagging apartment buildings full of senior citizens and recovering addicts, and across the street from warring Greek and Turkish restaurants. Most days, the neighborhood ignores her and her [...]

June 2017 ISSUE

Neptune's Trident

The submarines were gone, had been gone for years. Officially they had been destroyed, torpedoed in the North Atlantic during the first six months of the clampdown, though Caitlin allowed herself to believe that someday they would come home, streaming nose to tail up the firth like salmon nearing their spawning grounds. If the subs [...]

June 2017 ISSUE

An Account of the Sky Whales

An in-flight announcement woke me as the ship entered Goliath’s atmosphere in the dead of night. I opened the window shade and was bathed in cool moonglow, which caused the middle-aged woman dozing next to me to stir briefly. I got closer to the window and looked down. A sprawling expanse of cloud layers, like [...]

May 2017 ISSUE

The Person Who Saw Cetus

Our fourth podcast for May is “The Person Who Saw Cetus” written by Tang Fei and read by Kate Baker.

 
icon for podpress  Clarkesworld Magazine Issue 128 - The Person Who Saw Cetus by Tang Fei [43:42m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download (19028)

 
Originally published in Chinese in
Cosmos Is Calling: Gogo, edited by Chen Kun, December 2015.
 
Translated and published in partnership with Storycom.

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May 2017 ISSUE

Streams and Mountains

Man discovers fire. Man discovers philosophy. Man discovers boredom.
What is it about the squatting position, Mary Ellund wondered, looking down at Paul’s bent back, that calls to mind contemplative pursuits?
The breeze picked up, the forest shivered. A thatch of red cedar boughs, two hundred feet above, shook down droplets on her head. Mary pulled up [...]

May 2017 ISSUE

The Person Who Saw Cetus

“What should I do? Turn gray with the pitch-black night?”

She would always remember that summer day. Father’s enormous shadow settled upon her; she looked up from her workbook.
“Lilian.” Father squatted before her desk, the crimson clouds outside draped across his shoulders. Father said her name again, then once more. Funny; never had there been a [...]